CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors

CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors
CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors
CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors
CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors
CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors
CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors
CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors
CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors
CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors
CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors
CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors
CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors

CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors
For your kind consideration: a 100% cotton (I also have a limited supply of pure silk) HAIR NET in the color of your choice. If you need a special color or wish to match a certain fabric please contact me. Each net is hand crocheted in 100% cotton using either size 5 (pearl cotton), size 10 (bedspread thread) and even size 20 (very fine crochet cotton). You may choose from a variety of colors. These nets are quite full and have a natural elasticity that allows them to accommodate very long hair. I have been supplying hair nets to re-enactors for over 30 years from Mississippi to Florida, California to Iowa and even here in New Mexico Anyone who remembers Turtle Run Mercantile say hi! COLORS AVAILABLE: Black, steel gray, white, off-white, cream, red (several shades), maroon, rose, pink, shocking pink, variegated pink, pink chenille, peach, butter-cup, yellow, maize, gold, rust, dark brown, green, pale green, sea foam green, moss green, mint green, variegated green, royal blue (silk boucle), sky blue, turquoise and turquoise with silver metallic, variegated blues, baby blue and white double thread, dark and light lavender, dark purple. HAIR NET/SNOOD HISTORY: The word snood was first recorded in Old English from some time around 725. It was widely used in the Middle Ages for a variety of cloth or net head coverings, including what we would today call hairbands and cauls, as well as versions similar to a modern net snood. Snoods continued in use in later periods, especially for women working or at home. In Scotland and parts of the North of England, a silken ribbon about an inch wide (called a snood) was worn specifically by unmarried women, as an indicator of their status, until the late 19th or early 20th century. It was usually braided into the hair. Snoods came back into fashion in the 1860s, although the term “snood” remained a European name, and Americans called the item simply a “hairnet” until some time after they went out of fashion in the 1870s. These hairnets were frequently made of very fine material to match the wearer’s natural hair color , and worn over styled hair. These snoods were different from those of the 1940s. They became popular again in Europe during World War II during which there was strict rationing of the amount of material used in clothing, by the British government. Headgear was not rationed. Snoods were favored in order to show one’s commitment to the war effort and to keep “Rosie the Riveter’s” hair safely out of the way. HAIRNETS IN THE 1800’S Styled hair was often further confined in decorative hairnets, especially by younger women. NOTE: Though many modern reenactors refer to this garment as a “SNOOD” it is not a period term for this article of clothing; snoods were something else entirely. These hairnets were frequently made of very fine material to match the wearer’s natural hair color, but occasionally more elaborate versions were made of thin strips of velvet or chenille (sometimes decorated with beads). Whether plain or resplendent, many hairnets were edged with ruchings of ribbon that would serve to adorn the crown of the wearer’s head. Nets are still as popular as ever, and made of high-colored chenille, gold cord, narrow black velvet, with a gold or pearl bead at each crossing. Godey’s Lady’s Book, December 1860. Small nets are now made for waterfalls which are of a very fine silk, either black or the color of the hair. Indeed nets of any kind are still in vogue, some very highly trimmed with flowers, lace, or ribbon, for dinner or small companies, some of bright colors, forming the Scottish plaids. Godey’s Lady’s Book, December 1864. Hair nets were not confined to the 1850’s and 60’s. Peterson’s Magazine shows a net as late as December 1876. It is described as a new-fashioned net for the hair, now so popular. It is made of wide braid, in large meshes, and of any color which may be preferred, although that of the hair is generally adopted. The ribbon can either e of the color of the net, or if desired, of some fancy color. THE CARE AND FEEDING OF YOUR HAIRNET This hair net has been carefully hand crafted from an 1856 pattern, of fine yarn or thread. The easiest way to put on your hair net is: gather your hair into a pony tail with one hand. Bend the hair mass in half and shove it into the bag of the hair net, then pull the net forward onto your head. Tuck in stray tails of hair and slide the band back onto your head just above the ears. Fluff you hair in the bag of the net to fill the net. Nets may be gently hand washed in Woolite or baby shampoo using lukewarm water, lukewarm rinse. Cold water wash and rinse for wool nets. Block the net to its original bag shape and air dry, flat on an absorbent towel. Cotton nets may be dyed quite successfully to a darker shade with any good commercial dye. The elastic may be replaced with a ribbon, but I find that the round elastic, (which was available the 1860s) holds the hair in place best. If the elastic seems too loose, it may be retied a bit tighter. If it loses its elasticity, it may be replaced with new Round Elastic, which is available at fabric or craft stores. Period illustrations show the hair was dressed, that is, the hair was properly combed, pinned and arranged before being covered with the net. Short haired ladies, please, do not wear an empty snood hanging off of the back or your head. It does not disguise the fact of your short hair, it just looks silly! Inexpensive hair pieces, switches, even doll wigs can be pinned to your own natural hair, inside the hair net, to give the look of long hair. I hope you will enjoy your hair net. I offer a lifetime guarantee. If the net comes un-stitched or has any flaw, I will replace it. Nets may be beaded, tasseled or made of fancy yarns as you wish. I have many colors of thread in 100% cotton (also in silk, wool and rayon) as well as with a rainbow of bead options. Please feel free to contact me with any questions. Thanks for looking and Happy eBaying! The item “CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors” is in sale since Tuesday, December 20, 2016. This item is in the category “Clothing, Shoes & Accessories\Costumes, Reenactment, Theater\Costumes\Women”. The seller is “rgc52″ and is located in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Theme: Civil War
  • Size: One size fits most
  • Style: Snood
  • Color: Multi-Colors Available
  • Brand: Hand Made
  • Material: 100% Cotton
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Purpose: Reenactments, Renaisance Faire, Masquerade, 40’s

CIVIL WAR, VICTORIAN, Hand Crocheted HAIR NET (SNOOD) 100% COTTON Many Colors

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